Friday, 17 July 2020

Walking the Morghew Park Estate.




The public path crosses the front lawn of the house 





  



and on past the Dutch House

to the Wealden countryside beyond.

The Morghew Park Estate can trace its ancestry back over a thousand years. 


Read about it here.

Monday, 6 July 2020

Passport Portraits of Yesteryear no.46

Continuing the series of passport portraits in my collection.
Peruse and wonder.
The Port of New York on 31st July 1918 and British seaman Frederick Arthur Kennett wishes to disembark from his ship. This is his portrait on the US Seaman’s Identification Card which was required of all foreign seamen arriving in the USA during the Great War. The official opinion was, 

'...a large number of dangerous and undesirable aliens are using every effort to enter the country in the guise of seamen.... It is known that many such desert.'
  
Fred Kennett is seen here in the uniform of a chief petty officer in the Royal Navy. The Great War will be over in four months and Fred will exploit his experience to obtain a Master’s Certificate, sailing during the 1920s and 1930s from the British ports of Southampton, Bristol, Cardiff and Liverpool across the Atlantic Ocean to New York and Vera Cruz. In World War 2 he crosses the Atlantic in 1942 arriving in New York on 4th October and in 1946, at the age of fifty eight, he is in Miami.

Hold on, there's someone on the line...

How else would you cross such a busy (!) road?

Friday, 26 June 2020

Out in the rain.

I was fed up of cycling in all that sunshine and at least the rain was warm.
 The thunder was a bit noisy though.

Saturday, 20 June 2020

I know how the sun feels...





I know just how it feels. 

I didn't want to get up this 
morning either.









But it soon shook off its lethargy and began to play, making interesting shadows on the road.

Thursday, 4 June 2020

I've found a new dunghill.





A touch of morning mist awaiting the sun to clear it.



Horses grazing in the fields.












And the sheep are now turned out onto the minnis. 

A minnis is an old Kentish word to describe an area of cleared grazing common land in the middle of a hill top wood.



 



And I've found a new dung hill on my circuit. 

That brings the total to six.




Friday, 29 May 2020

Crops in the morning sunlight.

  



Barley

 Beans, right




Vines, left







 



Too early to say what this is.

Maize?

I'll keep you posted.